Featured print

The Alphabet of the Scattered Mind I – Dunja Janković

500kr inc. Vat

  • Screen poster hand printed at Longest Night September 2021
  • Format 46x64cm
  • Printed on Munken Pure 240 g
  • 4 colors
  • Limited edition, 100 copies
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Description

The Alphabet of the Scattered Mind I-III is a series of screen printed posters and experiments with Croatian artist Dunja Janković.

“The images were created at a time of big distress as an effort to communicate with a still unfinished version of my new self. Like learning to talk in a new language with sentences that are warped and truncated but beautiful in their sincerity and freshness.“

The three graphics dance with each other on paper and the order of layers is both mathematical and intuitive, the colors beg to twist and turn. The series is extremely precise and completely free at the same time, an excursion through Dunja’s universe of forms, shapes and colors to metaphysical freedom or a scattered mind struggling to stay focused on one thought at a time. During the printing process we also worked on three unique artist books, each containing 20 pages of experimental combinations of layers from all three graphics.

Here is a video of another vibrating screen voyage that Dunja took together with the Portugese screen printing collective Oficina Arara.

Additional information

Weight 1 kg
Dimensions 55 × 8 × 8 cm
Format

46x64cm

Print workshop

Longest night

Technique

Screen print

Artist

Dunja Janković

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Studio visit

Artist John Andersson with his print Black sheep cat family

John Andersson – To come home

John Andersson sees things. He is flooded by images. No matter how fast he can draw, there is no way he can catch up. John Andersson is the medium for an unstoppable stream of visions of 20th century pop culture against a backdrop of dull suburban architecture from the golden era of Swedish socialism. No matter how strange or far or deep the visions go they are always rooted at home: The last stop on the green subway line south, a Stockholm satellite center surrounded by tower blocks, a square and a few shops – groceries, tobacco, flowers, hairdresser, a cafe and a restaurant with alcohol license. A home with a spectacular view over the southern suburbs, salmon colored 50’s architecture, green parks and concrete public art. A magical place with a portal to a third dimension. The future is not what it used to be, says John Andersson. It’s too dystopian these days.* Once the future used to be soaked in sweet nostalgia.

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